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Aleksandr Rodchenko (1891-1956)

Aleksandr Rodchenko (1891-1956)
Mother, 1924
Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1960s
11 3/8 x 8 ¼ in. (28.9 x 21 cm)
Artist’s initials (A.M.R.) written by Linhart in pencil on verso
Lubomir Linhart Collection stamp on verso

Matthew Witkovsky wrote of that portrait, "One of Rodchenko's first photographs, this portrait signifies a revolution on many levels. While his mother holds up one half of a pair of spectacles to help her read (a skill she acquired only at fifty), Rodchenko stands before her testing a recently purchased camera, the monocular medium of the future...His mother's face, furrowed in concentration, her work-worn hand, and the kerchief wrapped around her head thereby convey a heroic character without trading in sentimentality. We apprehend the resulting picture, moreover, in much the way that Rodchenko's mother puzzles over her reading. The interaction of hands and lenses has in both cases brought the world radically into focus, magnifying earthshaking changes that, for all their promise of clarity, are still difficult or impossible to comprehend.”

- Matthew Witkovsky, Curator and Chair, Department of Photography, The Art Institute of Chicago
 

Aleksandr Rodchenko (1891-1956)

Aleksandr Rodchenko (1891-1956)
Steps, 1929
Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1960s
Image 6 3/8 x 8 7/8 in (16.2 x 22.5 cm)
Paper 6 ½ x 9 1/8 in. (16.5 x 23.2 cm)
Artist’s name, title, and year 1930 written by the artist’s daughter, Varvara Stepanova, in pencil on verso



"A classic example of a new way of seeing, [Steps] is shot employing his choice of a more interesting vantage point. Rigorously modernistic, the image is visually compelling – rhythmic lines glide elegantly at an angle while perfectly complementing the moving silhouette of the Madonna-like mother and baby. It was taken at the steps of Moscow’s 19th Century Orthodox Church of the Holy Saviour which was knocked down in 1931 to make way for the construction of the Palace of the Soviets, which unfortunately failed to be realised.

"In 1929, the Russian socio-political and literary magazine Dayosh frst published this image together with a shot of the wall of Novodevichy Convent, with the shared title “A Summers Day”. An important image to the artist himself, it was shown as part of the 1935 Exhibition of the Work of the Masters of Soviet Photography in Moscow and is said to have bought him some needed favour from Stalin. At the time, his ideals, like those of many other artists, clashed with the increasingly authoritarian government.

"During his lifetime, Rodchenko was heavily criticised for being too formalist in his art. Today, not only is Rodchenko lauded as a visionary but also for his iconic images, which continue to provide artistic stimulation."

Catalogue essay, Phillips Photographs, London, Auction 6 November 2015

Boris Ignatovich (1899-1976)

Boris Ignatovich (1899-1976)
With a Board, 1929, printed 1960s
Gelatin silver print
9 5/8 x 6 1/2 in. (24.5 x 16.5 cm)
Signature and date in pencil and photographer's stamp on verso


A worker skillfully balances on a piece of lumber while carrying another piece of wood over his shoulder. This photograph is one of the best examples of Constructivist composition. Leading avant-garde artist El Lissitzky incorporated With a Board into his design for the cover of Russland, one of a series of books entitled Neues Bauen in der Welt (1929) that represented the architectural fantasies of America, France, and Russia.
 

Boris Ignatovich (1899-1976)

Boris Ignatovich (1899-1976)
Still Life, 1928, printed c. 1960s
Gelatin silver print
Image 6 5/8 x 9 1/8 in. (16.8 x 23.2 cm)
Paper 7 x 9 1/2 in. (17.8 x 24.1 cm)
Photographer's stamp on verso


Ignatovich documents advances in literacy among the working class in Still Life, 1928; the workers’ hands and the newspaper Soviet Labor, shot from above, are surrounded by the circular shapes of cups, teapots, biscuits, and sausages. Every detail in this perfectly framed composition tells a story of the time in rural Russia of late 1920s. 

 

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)
Soviet patriot, 1987
Unique vintage photocollage with gelatin silver print and fabric
8 x 9 1/4 in. (20 x 23.5 cm)


The series Nomenklatura of Signs is a biting critique of the Soviet class of powerful bureaucrats known as the nomenklatura. Titarenko especially criticizes Soviet visual propaganda such as posters, signs, slogans. In his view, the nomenklatura imposed propaganda upon the Soviet psyche, and deprived the Soviet person of his or her individuality and authenticity. Titarenko mocks this dehumanizing propaganda in his collages and photomontages by depicting the Soviet subject as an assemblage of prosaic signs and symbols. Inspired by the traditions of dada and futurism, Titarenko poetically destroys and recreates meaning from these signs in his collages by combining torn-up portraits, fragments from Leonid Brezhnev’s speeches, and scraps of red linen. With irreverence and biting humor, he expresses the need for deeper portrayals of human experience and its assortment of misfortunes, struggles and joys.

Nomenklatura of Signs was first exhibited in 1989 in Paris. In  the early 1990, it was published by Aperture in the catalogue for their exhibition Photostroyka: New Soviet Photography, which toured the United States for three years. Today, prints from the series can be found in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; the State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg; and the Centre National de l’Audovisuel, Luxembourg, among other museums. In 2020, the series was published by Damiani in the book Nomenklatura of Signs.
 

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)
1 Khalturina Street (red flag), 1987
Unique vintage photocollage with gelatin silver print and fabric
8 x 9 1/4 in. (20 x 23.5 cm)


The series Nomenklatura of Signs is a biting critique of the Soviet class of powerful bureaucrats known as the nomenklatura. Titarenko especially criticizes Soviet visual propaganda such as posters, signs, slogans. In his view, the nomenklatura imposed propaganda upon the Soviet psyche, and deprived the Soviet person of his or her individuality and authenticity. Titarenko mocks this dehumanizing propaganda in his collages and photomontages by depicting the Soviet subject as an assemblage of prosaic signs and symbols. Inspired by the traditions of dada and futurism, Titarenko poetically destroys and recreates meaning from these signs in his collages by combining torn-up portraits, fragments from Leonid Brezhnev’s speeches, and scraps of red linen. With irreverence and biting humor, he expresses the need for deeper portrayals of human experience and its assortment of misfortunes, struggles and joys.

Nomenklatura of Signs was first exhibited in 1989 in Paris. In  the early 1990, it was published by Aperture in the catalogue for their exhibition Photostroyka: New Soviet Photography, which toured the United States for three years. Today, prints from the series can be found in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; the State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg; and the Centre National de l’Audovisuel, Luxembourg, among other museums. In 2020, the series was published by Damiani in the book Nomenklatura of Signs.
 

Male worker (version 5), 1988

Male worker (version 5), 1988
Unique vintage gelatin silver photomontage
Image 6 5/8 x 6 7/8 in. (16.8 x 17.5 cm)
Board 8 x 9 1/4 in. (20.3 x 23.5 cm)
Signed and dated by the artist on verso


The series Nomenklatura of Signs is a biting critique of the Soviet class of powerful bureaucrats known as the nomenklatura. Titarenko especially criticizes Soviet visual propaganda such as posters, signs, slogans. In his view, the nomenklatura imposed propaganda upon the Soviet psyche, and deprived the Soviet person of his or her individuality and authenticity. Titarenko mocks this dehumanizing propaganda in his collages and photomontages by depicting the Soviet subject as an assemblage of prosaic signs and symbols. Inspired by the traditions of dada and futurism, Titarenko poetically destroys and recreates meaning from these signs in his collages by combining torn-up portraits, fragments from Leonid Brezhnev’s speeches, and scraps of red linen. With irreverence and biting humor, he expresses the need for deeper portrayals of human experience and its assortment of misfortunes, struggles and joys.

Nomenklatura of Signs was first exhibited in 1989 in Paris. In  the early 1990, it was published by Aperture in the catalogue for their exhibition Photostroyka: New Soviet Photography, which toured the United States for three years. Today, prints from the series can be found in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; the State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg; and the Centre National de l’Audovisuel, Luxembourg, among other museums. In 2020, the series was published by Damiani in the book Nomenklatura of Signs.

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)
Dead souls (variant), 1986
Unique vintage gelatin silver photomontage
7 1/8 x 7 1/8 in. (18 x 18 cm)
13 x 13 in. (33 x 33 cm)
Signed and dated by the artist on verso


The series Nomenklatura of Signs is a biting critique of the Soviet class of powerful bureaucrats known as the nomenklatura. Titarenko especially criticizes Soviet visual propaganda such as posters, signs, slogans. In his view, the nomenklatura imposed propaganda upon the Soviet psyche, and deprived the Soviet person of his or her individuality and authenticity. Titarenko mocks this dehumanizing propaganda in his collages and photomontages by depicting the Soviet subject as an assemblage of prosaic signs and symbols. Inspired by the traditions of dada and futurism, Titarenko poetically destroys and recreates meaning from these signs in his collages by combining torn-up portraits, fragments from Leonid Brezhnev’s speeches, and scraps of red linen. With irreverence and biting humor, he expresses the need for deeper portrayals of human experience and its assortment of misfortunes, struggles and joys.

Nomenklatura of Signs was first exhibited in 1989 in Paris. In  the early 1990, it was published by Aperture in the catalogue for their exhibition Photostroyka: New Soviet Photography, which toured the United States for three years. Today, prints from the series can be found in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; the State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg; and the Centre National de l’Audovisuel, Luxembourg, among other museums. In 2020, the series was published by Damiani in the book Nomenklatura of Signs.
 

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)
58th Street, New York, 2012
Gelatin silver print
16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm)
Edition 8 of 10


“Beginning in 2004, Titarenko slowly began to photograph New York, but he only truly took up the city as his subject after 2010. His work in New York continues today, but it is already possible to compare some of his latest images with his earlier bodies of work. Titarenko remains a Symbolist photographer. Using time exposure and darkroom technique, his goal is still to create a print that expresses his experience when creating the image. As Irina Tchmyreva has written, his photographs “paint with symbols, lifting them to the surface from the murk of reality.” With New York as his subject thus far, the built environment assumes a stronger presence. Several images, including Domino Factory and Sail, both from 2011, make use of wide horizons, creating distant viewpoints uncommon in previous work. Even the images that are reminiscent of previous work made at street level with ghostly traces of passersby, such as 58th Street, 2012, and Fifth Avenue, 2010, reflect the dominance of New York’s architecture over the individual.

“For Titarenko, each city and its people dictate the images he creates. His images reflect his attempt to reach a deeper understanding of place through the effects of history. It should not be surprising, then, that Titarenko’s vision of New York resonates with the work of Alvin Langdon Coburn and Alfred Stieglitz—men who strived to embody the dynamism of the city and its people in photographs at the turn of the twentieth century. As Titarenko’s relationship with New York grows and changes, so too will the photographs he creates. It is the nature of his working method.”

Sean Corcoran, Curator of Prints and Photographs, Museum of the City of New York
From the essay “New World,” as published in The City is a Novel (Damiani, 2015)
 

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)

Alexey Titarenko (b. 1962, St. Petersburg)
Midtown Sunrise, 2018
Gold and selenium toned gelatin silver print
Image 17 1/8 x 17 1/8 in. (43.5 x 43.5 cm)
Paper 19 5/8 x 23 5/8 in. (50 x 60 cm)
Edition of 5
Signed, dated and editioned in pencil on verso


After spending over thirty years photographing the cities of St. Petersburg, Venice, and Havana, in the early 2000s Titarenko turned his lens toward a very different city: New York. In this series, Titarenko brings his longstanding concerns with time and history to bear on a relatively young city known for its relentless, headlong pace. Titarenko is known for applying long exposure to street photography, and this technical innovation reaches its peak in his photographs of New York, where buses, taxis, trains, and planes are in constant movement against a backdrop of both turn-of-the-century façades and the multivalent, overlapping signage of the modern era. In Midtown Sunrise, we see how this use of long exposure combines with Titarenko’s masterful, painterly application of selective toning. An everyday scene, a tree on a busy city block, becomes a moment of awe and grace; Titarenko frames a solitary tree in the center of a whirlwind of passers-by and vehicles, and crowns its branches with a halo of gold.
 

George Tice (b. 1938, Newark)

George Tice (b. 1938, Newark)
Petit's Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, 1974
Platinum print
8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)


George Tice’s most iconic photograph, Petit’s Mobil Station recalls the magnificent abandon of an Edward Hopper painting, and has become emblematic of the quintessential American urban landscape. Tice photographed Petit’s Mobil Station en route to visit his girlfriend at the time. Exiting the New Jersey turnpike around dusk, Tice propped up his camera on the side of the road and set a 2 minute exposure. To preserve the scene’s serene emptiness — one where the flat-top sedan is the only sign of human activity— Tice covered the lens every time a new car pulled up to the pump. The platinum and palladium that Tice used to print the photograph evokes the richness of light, giving the station an unexpected gravitas.

 

Porch, Monhegan Island, Maine, 1971, printed 2015

Porch, Monhegan Island, Maine

1971, printed 2015
Platinum/palladium print

13 3/8 x 8 7/8 in. (34.0 x 22.5 cm)

 

The Monhegan Island home where Porch was photographed has inspired painters and photographers alike. The painter Rockwell Kent, who built the home, was its first resident — and such paintings as Winter, Monhegan Island, 1907, are testament to his affection for the Maine island. He often received visitors such as Robert Henri, who later wrote of his experiences, “I have never seen anything so fine.” Jamie Wyeth, the son of the late realist painter Andrew Wyeth, was residing in the home when Tice visited in 1971. Tice discovered the home while lodging with the island’s lighthouse keeper nearby. Porch was included in Tice's 1973 series Seacoast Maine: People and Places.

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)
#123 from This is You [Here]
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
10 14 x 6 7/8 in. (26 x 17.5 cm)
Edition 13/20


This is You [HERE] is an ongoing series of photographs of a fictitious family. The figures’ identities are often partially obscured. The artists combine found photographs with their own artworks to raise questions about the unreliability of memory and the ways our memory skews, distorts, and reinvents our lived experience over time. The mesmerising radiance of this image somewhat echoes with Klimt’s portrait of The Woman in Gold.

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)
#853 from The Mouth of Krishna2019
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
6 5/8 x 10 1/4 in. (17 x 26 cm)
Edition 5/20

A power of gold is more present in this photograph. The sea filled with the golden sunlight appears almost as volcanic lava covering red rocks.  A single bird hovers over the sparkling lights as if carrying a divine message.

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)
#143 from This is You [Here]
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
10 3/5 x 7 1/8 in. (27 x 18 cm)
Edition 10/20


 

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)
#147 from This is You [Here]
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
10 1/4 x 6 5/8 in. (26 x 17 cm)
Edition 3/20

 

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969, Spain)
#512 from The Mouth of Krishna, 2016, printed 2018
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
6 1/4 x 9 5/8 in. (16 x 24.5 cm)
Edition 12/20

A homage to the celebrated Japanese photographer Shoji Ueda. 

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969)

Albarrán Cabrera (b. 1969)
#138 from This is You [Here]
Pigment print on gampi paper and gold leaf
6 5/8 x 10 1/4 in. (17 x 26 cm)
Edition 1/20

 

"The structure of cities, the architecture of houses, squares, gardens, public walks, gateways, railway stations, etc – all these provide us with the basic principles of a great Metaphysical aesthetic... We, who live under the sign of the Metaphysical alphabet, we know the joy and sorrows to be found in a gateway, a street corner, a room, on the surface of a table, between the sides of a box…"

-Giorgio de Chirico

 

Gardenia

Denis Brihat (b. 1928, Paris)
Gardenia, 1994, printed 2001
Gelatin silver print with sulfuration
15 x 19 1/8 in. (38.1 x 48.6 cm)
Edition of 4 A.P.


In 1958, dissatisfied with urban life and commercial work, photographer Denis Brihat left Paris for the Luberon region of Provence. Undeterred by the isolation and the rustic conditions – he had neither electricity nor running water – he built a darkroom and studio on the Plateau des Claparèdes and began his groundbreaking experiments in photography, printmaking, and, above all, observation, turning his eye toward the quotidien but dazzling beauty of the natural world. “The subjects he favoured, in nature or his close surroundings, weren’t unusually beautiful, but simple, and of the sort that often passes unnoticed,” writes photographer Pierre-Jean Amar. “His eminently poetic style of photography glorified them and paid them due tribute, inviting people to open their eyes and recognize the proximity of grace.”

Influenced by the masterful prints of Edward Weston and the frescos of Fernand Léger, Brihat came to produce what he called “photographic paintings” – unique, archival, material prints, made for the wall, rather than images meant for mass reproduction in the pages of a magazine. This concern with process and technique finds its apotheosis in his remarkable experiments with color, which he began as early as 1968, in the wake of acclaimed exhibitions of his work at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Brihat’s richly colored photographs of fruits and flowers begin as traditional black-and-white darkroom prints, which he then tones with the salts of gold, iron, selenium, vanadium, and uranium, among other metals. The reaction of these metals with the silver salts in the emulsion produces hues that are original, one-of-a-kind, and permanent. The resulting prints exude a vividness and a luminosity that are truly unequalled in color photography.

Ingar Krauss (b. 1965, East Berlin)

Ingar Krauss (b. 1965, East Berlin)
Black locust blossom, Zechin, 2014
Gelatin silver print with applied oil paint
20 ½ x 17 3/8 in. (52 x 44 cm)
Edition 5/8


In 2010, Krauss began working on a series of still lifes – embarking, in effect, on a new form of portraiture, one in which his subjects were not human faces and personalities but the flora and fauna of the natural world. Krauss carefully arranges his pears, quinces, lilacs, and taxidermied animals in stage-like boxes of his own construction, then shoots the composition under natural light and creates a gelatin-silver print to which he applies a delicate glaze of oil paint. Some subjects are suspended from a string at the top of the box, while others are positioned in the foreground against a deep, darkening depth of field, echoing the work of the dramatic Baroque Spanish still-life painter Juan Sánchez Cotán (1560-1627) and placing the natural world, both literally and metaphorically, on a pedestal.

As Krauss explained in a 2017 interview with Roberta Levy, "Since I moved my studio from Berlin to the Brandenburg countryside, I became a gardener and dedicate a lot of time to plants and vegetables, and so they naturally became a privileged pictorial subject – in the tradition of German Romanticism and its longing for self-knowledge in nature. I am photographing the fruits and vegetables by arranging them in simple still lifes, using sometimes also dead birds or other animals which I found around my garden or which I got from old men in the neighborhood who are hunting and fishing. I am interested in the hidden relationship between the inner life of human beings and the world of plants and animals, and I want to transmute those commonplace subjects by a process of replacing inattention with contemplation."
 

Ann Rhoney (b. 1953), Niagara, 1979, painted 2017

Ann Rhoney (b. 1953)

Niagara, 1979, painted 2017

Vintage gelatin silver print with applied oil paint

Image 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. (23.5 x 18.4 cm)
Paper 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)

 

A native of Niagara Falls, Rhoney approaches her work with a painter’s sensitivity to color and light. She applies oil paints by hand to her gelatin-silver prints, allowing each piece to transcend the two-dimensional picture plane. In seemingly black and white photograph of the Niagara, Rhoney creates a powerful vision of the Falls as transparent and luminous against the darkness of the sky, dark waters shimmer with hues of greens, blues and purple.

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
The Balearics, Spain, 2014
Gelatin silver print
Image 7 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (19.1 x 16.5 cm)
Paper 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)


 

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
Lake Numakawa, Japan, 2005
Toned gelatin silver print
Image: 9 7/8 x 8 in. (25.1 x 20.3 cm)
Paper: 11 7/8 x 9 1/2 in. (30.2 x 24.1 cm)


 

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
Kirkkonummi, Finland (two swans), 2016
Gelatin silver print
Image 9 5/8 x 8 in. (24.5 x 20.3 cm)
Paper 12 x 9 3/8 in. (30.4 x 23.8 cm)


Despite his frequent attention to dogs, cats, and other animals during his many travels, Sammallahti’s work finds its true apotheosis in birds. Residents of the land, sea, and sky, birds find their way into the artist’s field of vision no matter what continent or country he explores. In some photographs, they fill the frame as a flock, alighting from a tree or field, their speed and restlessness mirroring the artist’s own itinerant spirit; in others, one or two stands alone, sanctifying the spot with its quiet presence and its choice to break flight. In many photographs, the small shape of a bird is the anchor that unifies the entire composition, holding its own beneath a staggering sky, or bringing delicate balance to a jumble of branches or power lines.

In a 2012 review for The Guardian, writer Sean O’Hagan notes that Sammallahti “captures humans and animals in worlds of their own, lost in reverie: dogs chase birds, birds cautiously approach humans or circle above them…But what is most palpable is the silence of the surroundings. Looking at the photograph, you feel on the threshold of another, more mysterious world that is indeed here and far away.”
 

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki), Helsinki, Finland (dog stretching), 1982

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Helsinki, Finland (dog stretching), 1982

Gelatin silver print

Image 6 x 6 1/2 in. (15.2 x 16.5 cm)
Paper 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
Solovki, White Sea, Russia, 1992
Gelatin silver print
Image: 6 1/2 x 14 in. (16.5 x 35.6 cm)
Paper: 9 1/2 x 15 7/8 in. (24.1 x 40.3 cm)
Signed and dated in pencil on recto

This is one of the most iconic images taken in the North of Russia by the White Sea in winter of 1992, right after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Sammallahti created a humorous seires, many images populated with dogs, taken in the village famous for the Solovetsky monastery which was established duing the time of Ivan the Terrible and in 1921 turned into a Gulag camp.

Sammallahti describes himself as a wanderer who appreciates the nature of the great north, the silence, the cold, and the sea, and records the relationships between animals and their environments. 

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
Ristisaari, Finland (frog in water), 1974
Gelatin silver print
Image 7 7/8 x 6 3/8 in. (20 x 16.2 cm)
Paper 9 7/8 x 8 in. (25.1 x 20.3 cm)

 

A landmark figure in contemporary Finnish photography, Sammallahti was 24 when he took this photograph of a frog. His early photographs create a fairy-tale world, mysterious legends of forests and lakes. He has a supernatural sense of a moment in time with the sensitivity to the beauty and wonder of the world. 

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)

Pentti Sammallahti (b. 1950, Helsinki)
Western Cape, South Africa (dog and bird), 2002
Gelatin silver print
Image 6 1/4 x 8 3/4 in. (15.9 x 22.2 cm)
Paper 7 7/8 x 9 7/8 in. (20 x 25.1 cm)